July 20, 2017

Irish Dry Stout

One of the most common stouts, Dry Irish Stout tend to have light-ish bodies to keep them on the highly drinkable side. They're usually a lower carbonation brew and served on a nitro system for that creamy, masking effect. Bitterness comes from both roasted barley and a generous dose of hops, though the roasted character will be more noticeable. Examples of the style are, of course, the big three, Murphy's, Beamish, and Guinness, however there are many American brewed Dry Stouts that are comparable, if not better.

Old #38 Stout

A- / 4.1
Old #38 Stout

Named for a retired California Western Railroad steam engine on the Fort Bragg to Willits run through the Redwoods, Old No. 38 Stout is a smooth, firm-bodied stout with the toasted character and coffee notes of dark malts and roasted barley.

Guinness Extra Stout (Canada)

C+ / 2.8
Guinness Extra Stout Canada

This is it, the one that started it all. Crafted to perfection for over 200 years, GUINNESS® EXTRA STOUT is descended from the definitive West India Porter known as Extra Superior Porter. Crack it open, and the first sip tastes as fresh as ever. The unmistakeable deep-dark color, the crisp hint of roasted barley, the fresh breeze of hops, and the refreshing bite all make for the bittersweet reward.

Pure beauty. Pure GUINNESS®.

Murphy’s Irish Stout

B- / 3.0
Murphy's Irish Stout - Photo by Jeremy Keith

Murphy’s Irish Stout is a dry stout brewed in County Cork according to the original recipe by Murphy’s Brewery since 1856.